Philadelphia Hot Chocolate 5k/15k & Promo Code

(Disclaimer: I’m an ambassador for this race, and exchange for two posts for it, I’ve received a goody bag and entry into the race.)

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Who doesn’t love hot chocolate and running?

I certainly do. When I heard that the Hot Chocolate 5k/15k team was looking for ambassadors, I knew I had to sign up. The Hot Chocolate 5k/15k falls perfectly on April 6th: about a month prior to the Broad Street Run. You’ll have two options: a 5k or a 15k, both of which start at 7:15am on a Sunday at the Art Museum.

5ks at the Art Museum in Philly are my favorite: even though it’s not as pretty as Fairmount Park, they’re easily accessible for most people in the city without a car (especially for me–I can walk) and the Art Museum and Eakins Oval makes for a pretty cool after party.2013-HC-this-is-your-goodie-bag_WITH-sizing-chart

The race swag seems pretty awesome too–a fleece sweatshirt (we all have too many t-shirts anyway) and an awesome finisher’s mug. There will be Chocolate Fondue, Dippable Snacks and Hot Chocolate at the after party in Eakins Oval too!

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Register here with promo code “BallerinaMug” for an additional travel mug in your swag bag!

Check back here soon for more information and a giveaway–I’ll be giving one reader a free entry to the Hot Chocolate 5k/15k in a city of your choosing!

Major Moment Studio/Philly Dance Fitness

1624 South Street,
Philadelphia, PA

http://www.majormomentstudio.com/ and http://phillydancefitness.com/

info@majormomentstudio.com

267.687.6886

Classes offered: Ballet, Modern, Jazz, Pointe, Zumba, Impact Jazz, Zumba, and more

Description via Website: “Work up a sweat through the art of dance with Philly Dance Fitness. We offer group classes, private lessons and parties throughout Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley. Check out our packed schedule and pricing options. No experience required. Ditch the workout – join our dance party!”


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Reviews:

Beverly is an awesome teacher if you are new to ballet. She’s encouraging and offers several classes for all levels of beginners, however, you will always feel welcome in her classes no matter what your level is. I highly recommend her for those who have never taken ballet.

10 out of 10.

–Kristen

Take the Lead

4701 Pine Street
​Philadelphia, PA 19143

http://www.studioattakethelead.com/

studioattaketheleadonpine@gmail.com

215 471 3215

Classes offered: Ballet, Ballroom, Belly Dance, HipHop, Indian Traditional, Modern, Salsa, Wedding


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Description via website: “The Studio at Take the Lead on Pine is a place where talent & creativity come together in all dance forms.​​ We believe that anyone can dance! With the proper tools, even those who have two left feet or are rhythmically challenged can learn to do it, and to do it well. We see dance as a growing and learning experience that continues throughout a person’s life. Whether you’re a novice or professional, there is always something new, fun, exciting, and rewarding to be found in the countless varieties of dance. We offer an array of classes for children, teens, and adults.”

Reviews:

Evelein is a fantastic teacher from the Netherlands whose original passion for ballet lead her to Martha Graham in NYC. Philadelphia and I are very lucky to have her as a teacher. She is enthusiastic, patient, and encourages good habits.

10 out of 10.

–Luli

A Photoless Race Recap: Strides for Stroke 5k

Yup, I forgot to take a single picture. HQ and I ran our first 5k race this Sunday, the Strides for Stroke 5k in Philly.

Well, other than this screen shot of my nike + data.

Well, no pictures other than this screen shot of my nike + data.

HQ agreed to run with me at my turtle-like speed of 12:30 per mile and we did the entire race together. We ran most of it, only slowing down for a few water breaks and when my tummy wasn’t super happy (ugh, it was like that all weekend)–but we got it done. While it was cool to run on an empty Martin Luther King Drive, the slope of the pavement was rough on my shins.

 

My official time was 38:29. I’m already looking at another possible 5k for the end of the month–but the heat was really tough to deal with already at 8:30 in the morning.

This upcoming week HQ and I have tried to plan out our training a little bit more (thank you, Temple University for still letting me have access to the gym this summer) to include some cross training and some indoor running (on an indoor track) to help us beat the heat and this miserable rain. Running outdoors on the track during the summer just isn’t my thing (I still plan on getting some outdoor runs including our weekly long runs). I hope we can fit in a swim either Wednesday or Friday too. Ballet will hopefully happen Saturday morning (Thursday I’ve got friends possibly visiting and Philadelphia Runner’s Urban Scramble)–but I’m also heading home for birthday weekend so it’ll depend on my schedule.

What does your week look like?

 

Beginner Ballet Tips: Sewing Elastic to Ballet Slippers

Roughly one year and one month ago, I picked up my first pair of ballet slippers at one of the local dance stores in Philadelphia and was told I needed to sew the elastics myself. Nothing more. I was clueless. I searched online and was frustrated with every article and how-to telling me how to sew pointe shoe ribbons and elastics. I eventually found this video and sewed on my elastics the best I could:

Looking back at those shoes, my elastics were sewn kind of terribly (not because the technique in the video is bad, but just because I’m horrible at sewing). I wish I had found these tips by Adult Beginner and Dave Tries Ballet to help me out when I needed it. Adult Beginner uses a single elastic, so if that’s what you’ve got, go check her’s out. The video, Dave Tries Ballet, and my tutorial below deals with criss-cross elastics that are already sewn at the back-end. I wear Sansha split sole canvas shoes (I’m looking into trying more, I just bought these because I needed new shoes and knew these would fit if I ordered them online).

Here’s what you’ll need:

Shoes

Pen or Permanent Marker

Scissors

Safety Pins

Needle and Thread (I recommend Bunhead’s Stitch Kit if you don’t already have needles and thread lying around. It’s super thick, strong thread that will make sure the elastics will stay put both on pointe shoes and ballet slippers)

My elastics are pulled tight so that my shoes fit my feet.

Step 1. Tighten the elastic strings at the top of your ballet slipper until you get a nice fit. You don’t want them strangling your foot but you don’t want the shoes to be falling off either.

Step 2. Mark where you will sew the elastics with permanent marker at your arches by stretching them over your feet–I just sew mine to the middle seam in my slipper. Again, you want them to be holding your foot in but not too tight. I sew the elastic from the inside of the foot underneath and the one that comes in from the outside over (I’m pretty sure there’s no rules written in stone about this–I just know it’s mentioned in one of the videos I watched so that’s what I do). I then mark each slipper somewhere on the inside so I can quickly know which one is left and right without having to look super carefully at the elastic.

Step 3. Secure the elastic using a safety pin where you will sew them and try them on again, making sure that you’ve got the right fit. Point and flex your feet a couple of times.

Step 4: Cut the elastics if you need to so they fit into the shoe (I usually leave about 1/2 an inch from the very top part of the shoe so there’s enough to sew securely in). You could probably burn the elastics to make sure they don’t fray but I don’t find it necessary.

I can’t really give you any advice on doing the actual sewing part since I’m a novice at it–some people hand sew, others use a machine. Whichever method you choose, make sure you don’t sew into the elastic string that goes around the shoe by accident.

Step 5: Put your shoes on and check the elastic string for tightness again, making sure you’ve got it where you want it. Some people will leave their strings long and tie them in a bow and then tuck them in (they shouldn’t be left out so your foot doesn’t get dragged over them and/or so you don’t trip on them).Having all the loose strings shoved into my shoe drives me crazy, so I double knot mine (without tying a bow), cut them pretty short, and then burn the ends.

Step 6: Put them on, check for the correct fit (one last time!) and admire a job well done!

What do you wish you would’ve known before starting ballet classes?

PS If you’ve got any tips for how you attach your elastics to ballet slippers, let me know! This is still a work in progress for me!