Dance Book Club Anyone?

Recently I discovered that my university’s library has a small collection of dance-related books. I first went searching for them when I wanted to read Conditioning for Dance. Unfortunately, at the time, despite the library listing the book as being there, I couldn’t find it. I did however find Conditioning for Dancers. I haven’t read much of it (I’ve got some serious course reading to do now that my last semester of college has started and I’m enrolled in a Popular Fiction course–hello a novel a week). It looks really useful though, and it has some useful stretching techniques I’ve spotted as I flipped through the book. I also grabbed Dance Analysis: Theory and Practice, since I figured it might provide some helpful insight for writing critiques of dance performances.

When I read this article over at 4Dancers about The Pointe Book, I had to check to see if it was at my library. The books contains almost everything you’d want to know about pointe shoes, from their history, how to get fitted for pointe shoes, how to sew ribbons and elastic and care for them, how to teach pointe, information about pointe related injuries and treatment, and perhaps one of my favorite features of the book, sample pointe classes ranging from the first day pointe class from the American School of Ballet to adult pointe level

Cover of "The Pointe Book"

classes.

I also picked up Ballet 101, a complete guide to learning and loving ballet (which I haven’t read any of) because my knowledge of actual ballets is kind of lacking. I want to pick up a copy of The Ballet Companion as well; it looks like it could be a good resource.

Have you read any dance books? Which ones would you recommend?

Top 5 Blog Posts: Dance Advantage Round-Up

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I know, I’ve already posted this before, but since Dance Advantage’s monthly roundup is your top 5 posts, I figured I’d clean up this post a bit.

When I started this blog back in September, I didn’t expect to fall in love with ballet like I have now, attending four classes a week. Although it’s been a struggle (between two ankles injuries and a number of sicknesses), I’m looking forward to a new year where I won’t be so bogged down by class work and can attend even more ballet classes.

Why Should You Take Ballet Classes as An Adult? One of the very first posts I wrote for this blog, listing a lot of reasons why you should do ballet (a lot of them from readers). I’d love for this post to keep growing, so if you’ve got suggestions, add them.

Boyfriend Does Ballet I dragged my boyfriend to ballet at Koresh, and he helped write a post about it. I’m hoping to drag him to more classes in 2013.

What Was it Like to get Your First Pair of Pointe Shoes I love this post for how helpful everyone was in the comments. If you’re getting pointe shoes soon, read them.

Two Week Split Challenge: I made a plan to work on my splits with various yoga sequences and other stretching plans so that it wouldn’t get boring. It was an expansion on my 30 day challenge and a way to make the challenge really work.

Q & A with Julia and Aaron, the creators of Barre: A Real Food Bar. Julia and Aaron took some time out a few weeks ago to answer some questions for ABP.

What are some of your favorite posts YOU’VE written this past year?

(Note: a form of this has already been published. I cut it down to 5 posts for the Blog Circle at Dance Advantage.)

A Look Back at 2012: My Favorite Posts

cropped-img_0589.jpgWhen I started this blog back in September, I didn’t expect to fall in love with ballet like I have now, attending four classes a week. Although it’s been a struggle (between two ankles injuries and a number of sicknesses), I’m looking forward to a new year where I won’t be so bogged down by class work and can attend even more ballet classes.

Since it’s the end of 2012, I figured I’d share some of my favorite posts from this blog, especially if you haven’t been reading from the start.

Why Should You Take Ballet Classes as An Adult? One of the very first posts I wrote for this blog, listing a lot of reasons why you should do ballet (a lot of them from readers). I’d love for this post to keep growing, so if you’ve got suggestions, add them.

Ballerina Profile: Legal Ballerina Legal Ballerina was the first person to be interviewed for the site, and she’s been an awesome supporter of my blog, and she’s got an awesome blog as well you should definitely check out.

30 Day Stretch Challenge Although an injury got in my way, I still hope to continue to work on my splits using the 30 Day Stretch Challenge. Hoping to come up with more ideas to make in better in 2013.

Boyfriend Does Ballet I dragged my boyfriend to ballet at Koresh, and he helped write a post about it. I’m hoping to drag him to more classes in 2013.

What Was it Like to get Your First Pair of Pointe Shoes I love this post for how helpful everyone was in the comments. If you’re getting pointe shoes soon, read them.

Guest Post: Profile of Susan Attfield from Pretoria, South Africa Susan started her own ballet studio (although she is not instructor herself) in South Africa. She’s amazing.

Guest Post: Advice for Men: Scott offers some great advice for men in the adult beginner ballet world.

Q & A with Julia and Aaron, the creators of Barre: A Real Food Bar. Julia and Aaron took some time out a few weeks ago to answer some questions for ABP.

What are some of your favorite posts YOU’VE written this past year?

 

My Christmas Present: Pointe Shoes

pfMerry Christmas/Happy Holidays from Adult Ballerina Project!

Recently, the studio I go to, Major Moment (as part of Philly Dance Fitness) has started offering a Pre-Pointe/Pointe Workshop every month. The first two workshops I missed, in October because of my left ankle’s injury and in November because of a second bad case of tonsillitis.

Finally, in December, I was able to make it to the workshop.

My ballet instructor told me to not buy shoes before attending the workshop in December (although most girls wore pointe shoes for the workshop, about five of us did not). It  was held after our regular Saturday class so that we would be warm. We worked on exercises at the barre to help strengthen our feet and ankles as well as get used to pointe shoes. This is one of the reasons one of my main goals for winter break is to work on ankle strength. Yes, I know it’s not going to happen instantaneously and it’s going to require a lot of work, but I feel like I’m up for the challenge, especially since I should have more free time during my Spring semester at college.

When I return to Philly in January, the workshop will be offered twice a month, covering a lot of the same things.

For Christmas (with the help of my parents), I got my first pair of pointe shoes, which are Grishko “ProFlex” Pointe Shoe. Discount Dance describes them as

 ProFlex is ideal for dancers who wish to build strength through use of a flexible shoe, find it challenging to reach full pointe, or require a quick break-in for performance. 2007 models fit a remarkable variety of feet, with an anatomical form designed to relieve pressure on the big toe joint, based on targeted studies of foot shape and pointework dynamics. 2007 ProFlex is lightweight and comfortable, with a somewhat tapered box and medium platform, supportive yet non-constrictive medium-height U-shaped vamp, and 3/4-length pliable shank. Shank: Flexible.

Getting fitted for them at the Rosin Box wasn’t as terrifying as I thought it was going to be. When I arrived, the owner asked me some simple questions such as where I took classes, if it was my first time in pointe shoes (it was) and how often I’d be on pointe. He helped to pick the shoe based on the fact I’d only be doing very basic barre work en pointe two times a month. He also determined that I had “normal people feet.”  The first shoe he pulled out (the ProFlex shoe) fit pretty well. Going up en pointe for the first time was weird. While I tried on a couple more pairs, I settled on the ProFlex. Everything else felt weird and just not right.

Since I’m obviously no expert on pointe shoes, I asked everyone for advice about a month ago. Some of the best advice that appeared in the comments follows from this post.

From Purple Magnolia:

Some of the things it’s really good to think about when actually have the pointe shoes on are:
Are my feet completely in the box?
Is my big toe touching the end of the shoe without any backward pressure? (Make sure you clip your toenails before you go to be fit)
Are my toes being tightly held together, or are they on top of each other? (They should feel tightly held together)
Can I wiggle my toes?

Oh and make sure you were tights, and clip your toe nails before you go. It’s also a good idea to get pointe shoe fittings done at the end of the day as your feet are at the widest then.

The other thing that I think is quite important is that your fitter knows theat you’re a first timer for pointe. There are some shoes, like gaynor minden and shoes with 3/4 shanks that are not really suitable for beginners. 3/4 shanks because it takes a year or so to build up the strength and control in the intrinsic muscles of the foot to a good level, and beginning dancers in 3/4 shanks often ending up sinking down onto the back of the shank instead of fully supporting their weight through the whole foot. Gaynor mindens because they are quite a customised shoe and really until you’ve experienced a few pairs they’re not worth the extra cost.

From Legal Ballerina:

(1) Do not be scared, but I understand why you are. If your teacher said you are ready for pointe, you are ready. Do not question him/her. Let your teacher’s confidence in you give you the strength to power through your own feelings of self-doubt, ok??
(2) Don’t be intimidated about how it feels when you try pointe shoes on for the first time. It is a real weird feeling and it takes some time getting used too. Don’t worry; you will get used to it.
(3) Do not be surprised if your first pair of pointe shoes (i.e. size, maker, etc) ends being your “perfect” pointe shoe. Once you are en pointe for a while you will really understand your feet and what your needs are.

From mercitchatons:

Fitting was interesting. You want it to hold you firmly, but not squish you so when your foot is flat on the floor it doesn’t cramp. You can’t demi at the store and it’s kind of important to know how the shoe will break in when you go through demi. If it breaks in a certain way and is uncomfortable you’ll most likely have sore feet and or serious blisters. Don’t let this discourage you though. Usually your first pair will fit well until they are broken in and you need to get a whole new pair and realize what you’re starting to look for in a shoe.
Make sure your foot isn’t sinking and that there isn’t excess fabric bunching around here or there. It’s better to have a fitting shoe than a pretty shoe. But excessive bunching means the shoe is probably too big. Listen to what your foot/body says, they kept giving me metatarsal support/winged shoes and every pair was uncomfortable to me. She finally stopped. Do not go on other peoples recommendation of shoes that they love, it doesn’t mean it will work for you. You can always try their suggestion, but know it may not work.

If you have anymore advice, feel free to leave it in the comments!

Beginner Ballet Tips: What to do Over the Holidays

As I’ve written about recently, many of us won’t be able to make it to ballet classes over the holidays. I’ve made plans to stretch and do a few at home DVDs a few times a week, even though I know it won’t be the same as going to the classes I normally go to throughout the week. But it’ll have to do, especially as I visit friends this week and head to relatives houses in the middle of no where next week.

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